Equal Parenting Time: Beneficial or Harmful?

There are times when children have to endure divorce and separation proceedings. The real battle though is about child custody and who should have parental control. Divorce rates have nearly tripled in the last decade or so and child custody is something that courts have to deal with all the time. One of the ongoing issues with child custody is which parent should be the rightful guardian and caregiver of the child.

There are various factors that the court looks at in making this decision. Such factors include: whether a parent has a history of violence and abuse, financial status of the parent, and intimacy of parent with child. In some instances, the court will allow for joint custody where each parent will be given a chance to be with the child under certain scheduled times. These are usually not on a 50/50 basis, but rather on a scheduled basis or percentage that works best for the child. For this kind of equal child custody, there are legal and social ramifications that need to be addressed.

Equal Child Custody and Arising Problems

Equal child custody, the idea that both parents will be given an allotted amount of time to spend with the child, can be both beneficial and harmful. On the one hand, a child might have attachments to both parents and as a result might want to maintain a relationship with both. However, if one parent is abusive or excessively controlling, then this can be harmful for the child. Family Lawyer

Each state has different laws when it comes to child custody. For example, in Arizona, regardless of the parent’s character or temperament, the parent will be able to maintain contact with the child. In other states, equal custody does not mean 50/50. Instead,  both parents will maintain contact, but not necessarily an equal amount of time with the child.

In California, it is broken up into two categories. There is 1) legal custody and 2) physical custody. Legal custody is the right to make decisions on behalf of the child. Physical custody, as it sounds, is maintaining physical contact with the child. Both of this can be arranged for if the parent qualifies. However, as mentioned, equal child custody under either legal or physical grounds can be detrimental to the child.

There are studies that indicate that a child who is equally exposed to two parents with very different lifestyles and philosophies on life could produce confusion in the child and possibly emotional trauma. Socially, the child might not be able to interact with others of his age. This back-and-forth between parents could lead to long lasting psychological harm to the child. Aside from these psychological and social consequences, there are legal ones as well.

Constitutional Violation?

Child custody has always been at discussion for the courts because at its foundation, there is a constitutional issue. Giving one parent more rights than the other could be viewed as a potential equal protection violation under the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Under the Fourteenth Amendment, if one classification of people are treated differently than others, then this could be potential grounds for discrimination and hence a constitutional violation.

However, case law has already addressed this. Through case law and statutory authority, it has been established that this kind of unequal treatment is not discriminatory as it is for a legitimate government purpose: the protection of the child. There is an exception to this of course. If the distinction is on the basis of race, gender, or religion, then equal protection rights in accordance with the U.S. Constitution and enforced by the American Civil Liberties Union will be invoked.

Child custody is a concept that can leave a lasting impact on the child in both his mental and emotional growth. Legally, it is a state-by-state issue. Every case will be different but at the heart of it, the parent’s background and history will determine if they will have visitation rights or custody rights to the child. The distinction made between the parents is not a constitutional violation. Circumstantial factors will be looked at to see what is in the child’s best interest as well as for the parents.

0 Responses to “Equal Parenting Time: Beneficial or Harmful?”


  1. No Comments

Leave a Reply

*