Montana Congressman Gianforte Pleads Guilty to Assault, but Can He Face a Lawsuit?

Montana Congressman Greg Gianforte may have won election on May 25th, but his actions the previous night have already cast a shadow on his victory. Newly elected Congressman Gianforte was at a campaign rally/barbecue addressing a news crew from Fox News. Guardian Reporter Ben Jacobs entered the room and inquired Gianforte about his stance on the healthcare bill in the Senate after the Congressional Budget Office had given its score on the bill.

After Jacobs pressed Gianforte three times for an answer, Gianforte attacked Jacobs. Audio recording reveals shows signs of scuffing, Gianforte yelling “I’m sick and tired of you guys!” followed by Jacobs accusing Gianforte of body-slamming Jacobs and breaking the reporter’s glasses. The Fox News crew in the room testified that Gianforte grabbed Jacobs by the neck, slammed him into the ground, and then proceeded to punch the journalist a few times. Jacobs was taken to the hospital, although his injuries were not severe.

Gianforte’s campaign denied the allegations, instead accusing Jacobs of being a “liberal” who agitated Gianforte with his questions. However, the witnesses clearly stated that “at no point did any of us who witnessed this assault see Jacobs show any form of physical aggression toward Gianforte.” After winning though, Gianforte apologized to Jacobs in his victory speech.

Gianforte was charged with misdemeanor assault a few hours after the attack. He has since pled guilty of assault and received 180-day deferred sentence, 40 hours of community service, 20 hours of anger management, $300 fine, and $85 court fee. The deferred sentence means that Gianforte will not be facing any time in jail. However, the victim himself, Jacobs, could also bring a civil suit against the Congressman to recover for his own injuries.

Can Jacobs Successfully Sue the Congressman?

Normally, a private citizen cannot sue a public official for decisions that the official makes while in office. However, the Constitution’s “speech and debate” clause would not apply to the Jacobs case because Gianforte was not yet a Congressman when he allegedly assaulted Jacob. Even if Gianforte had been elected at that point though, Gianforte would still be potentially liable because hitting reporters is not a function of Congress and not be constitutionally protected.

Proving assault (and battery) would actually be very simple in a case like this. Jacobs would have to prove that Gianforte intended to cause reasonable fear of imminent harm. The audio shows that that attack was very intention on Gianforte’s part, as the Congressman declared “I’m sick and tired of you guys!” while hitting the reporter.

It’s questionable whether Jacobs felt any fear before the attack, as the attack seems to have happened so quickly that Jacobs had little time to react other than comment on his injuries – “Did you body slam me?” and “You broke my glasses.” Nevertheless, these types of remarks would likely be used as a means of showing that Jacobs did fear for his safety. Witness testimony also points that Gianforte grabbed his victim by the neck, which would cause most people to be afraid for their lives. However, it’s important to note that Gianforte doesn’t have to actually touch Jacob’s person to involve fear. Simply grabbing an object close to Jacob, such as his clothing or the recorder in Jacob’s hand, would be enough to satisfy this element.

Many online commenters have attempted to defend Gianforte by claiming that Jacobs entered the room uninvited or that Jacobs “deserved” it because Jacobs is a “liberal journalist.” Neither of those defenses would hold up in a court of law. The former is excessive force that the law doesn’t allow. Gianforte could have simply answered or ignored the question. Gianforte could have threatened to call security or the police. Instead, a Congressman chose to use violence against a man who was simply doing his job.

The latter is commentary about political beliefs, but has zero relevance as to whether or not the reporter was assaulted. The law is the law regardless of whether a person is liberal or conservative. The fact that line of thought – “liberal journalist” was even used to justify the assault is appalling beyond words, as it dehumanizes a man merely for having opinions.

If Jacobs is successful in court, and assuming Gianforte doesn’t want to settle before trial, Jacobs would be owed his compensatory damages, including medical expenses, repair or replacement for his glasses, and compensation for time off or emotional trauma. The judge might also consider adding punitive damages, as this case must serve as an example that physical violence is not acceptable in the public discourse, not even from a sitting Congressman.

0 Responses to “Montana Congressman Gianforte Pleads Guilty to Assault, but Can He Face a Lawsuit?”


  1. No Comments

Leave a Reply

*