H.R. 861 and H.R. 899: the End of the EPA and the Dept of Education

On February 3, 2017, the House of Representatives presented H.R. 861. The bill proposes to terminate the Environmental Protection Agency by December 31, 2018. On February 8, the House of Representatives also presented bill H.R. 899, a bill that proposes to terminate the Department of Education by December 31, 2018.

H.R. 861 and H.R. 899Environmental Protection Agency

The Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) was proposed under President Nixon in 1970 and approved by the House of Representatives and the Senate. The goal of the EPA was to make “the 1970s a historic period when, by conscious choice, [we] transform our land into what we want it to become.” The EPA’s mission is simple: to protect human health and the environment.  It is run by an agency of the Federal Government which writes and enforces environmental regulations based on laws passed by Congress. The EPA also gives grants to state environmental programs, non-profits, and educational institutions with the underlying purpose of protecting human health and the environment.

EPA Most Notable Accomplishments

You’ve probably heard of the Clean Air Act, a federal law designed to control air pollution. The Act is one of the most comprehensive air quality laws in the world and is administered and enforced by the EPA.

The Energy Star Program was launched by the EPA in 1992. It’s a voluntary program that encourages energy efficiency among various products such as major appliances, office equipment, lighting, home electronics and more.

Most recently, the EPA has been involved in researching the effects of climate change. The topic is controversial because many members of the GOP refuse to believe climate change exists, including our own President.

Department of Education

The Department of Education was signed into law by President Jimmy Carter in 1979 and began operating in 1980. It is administered by the U.S. Secretary of Education. The current Secretary of Education is Betsy DeVos. The Department has approximately 4,400 employees and its annual budget was $68 billion in 2016.

It’s a common misnomer that the Department of Education establishes schools and colleges. It does not. Instead, the primary function is to “establish policy for, administer and coordinate most federal assistance to education, collect data on U.S. schools, and to enforce federal educational laws regarding privacy and civil rights.” Its mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering education excellence and ensuring equal access.

Department of Education Notable Accomplishments

The Department of Education is responsible for gathering data to assess how well certain programs and grants are working. It also awards Pell grants federal financial aid through loans. With the rising cost of public education, more students than ever rely on financial aid to fund their education. An overwhelming majority of full-time undergraduate students at four-year colleges receive financial aid.

The Department also oversees and protects disadvantaged children from receiving sub-par education.

How to Pass the Bills

A bill becomes a law when it passes first through the House and then the Senate. A simple majority of the House (at least 218 votes) and the Senate (at least 51 votes) need to approve the bill for it to become law. Finally, the President must sign the bill into law, but the President can veto the bills and neither would become laws.

What Happens if the EPA and Department of Education Are Terminated?

All the advantages that the EPA and Department of Education provides would cease to exist. That means we would no longer fight climate change. It also means that financial aid would not be provided to students on a federal level. Students would have to rely on their individual states to help fund their education, which receives far less money. In turn, it will become harder for students to fund their education. And the disadvantaged youth of our nation will be left behind, with the wealthy receiving superior education and the struggling receiving sub-par education.

0 Responses to “H.R. 861 and H.R. 899: the End of the EPA and the Dept of Education”


  1. No Comments

Leave a Reply

*